By

John Davey

Updated

July 28, 2023

Edited By

Fausto Bucheli Jr
yellow center line on road
image credit - Bruno Ticianelli

Confused about SR22 insurance? This comprehensive post answers all your questions about SR22, from why you need it to how long it lasts. Learn valuable tips to get rid of SR22 faster and understand the differences in SR22 requirements across states.

Introduction

If you’re a licensed driver, you might have heard of an¬†SR22¬†before, but do you fully understand what it means and how it affects you? SR22 is a critical aspect of insurance for many drivers, especially those with a history of traffic violations or accidents. In this blog post, we’ll delve into the nitty-gritty of¬†SR22 insurance,¬†including why it’s needed,¬†how long¬†you need it, and valuable tips to help you get rid of it faster. Moreover, we’ll explore how SR22 requirements can vary from state to state. So, if you’re looking for comprehensive consumer information on SR22, you’ve come to the right place!

What is an SR-22?

An SR22 is not an insurance policy itself, but rather a certificate that proves you have the necessary auto insurance coverage. It is often required by the state’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) for drivers who have been involved in serious traffic violations, such as driving under the influence (DUI) or reckless driving. The SR22 serves as evidence that you carry the minimum required liability insurance, providing financial responsibility to the state. In essence, it’s a way for authorities to monitor high-risk drivers and ensure they remain insured.

Why Do I Need an SR-22?

If you find yourself in a situation where you need an SR22, it’s essential to understand why. There are several reasons why you might need an SR22:

  • DUI or DWI: If you were caught driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, your license might be suspended. To reinstate your driving privileges, you’ll likely need an SR22 to prove financial responsibility.
  • Reckless Driving: Engaging in reckless driving behavior, such as excessive speeding or street racing, can result in an SR22 requirement if you’re involved in an accident or receive multiple traffic tickets.
  • Driving Without Insurance: Being caught driving without insurance coverage could lead to the need for an SR22 to reinstate your license.
    Accidents with No Insurance: If you were involved in an accident while uninsured, you might need an SR22 to regain your driving privileges.

How Long Do I Need an SR-22?

The duration for which you need an SR22 can vary based on your specific situation and¬†the state you reside¬†in. Generally, SR22 requirements last between one to three years, but it’s crucial to check with your state’s DMV to confirm the exact duration.

The duration of your SR22 requirement typically begins from the date of the offense that led to the SR22 filing. For instance, if your state requires an SR22 for two years, and your offense was on January 1, 2023, you’ll likely need an SR22 until January 1, 2025.

It’s important to maintain continuous auto insurance coverage during the entire period you’re required to have an SR22. If your policy lapses or is canceled, your insurance provider is obligated to notify the DMV, which could result in the suspension of your license or even more severe penalties.

What is an FR-44?

An FR44 is a type of financial responsibility filing in Florida and Virginia for certain drivers. It is closely related to an  SR-22. The FR44 and SR22 serve the same general purpose, but they are distinct in terms of the severity of violations they address and the amount of liability coverage they mandate.

When is an FR44 Required?

An FR44 when a driver is convicted of severe violations, typically involving driving under the influence (DUI) or driving while intoxicated (DWI). The FR44 is often required in cases where the driver has been caught driving with a Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) level above the legal limit or has multiple DUI/DWI offenses.

Why is an FR44 Necessary?

The main purpose of an FR44 is to ensure that high-risk drivers carry sufficient liability insurance coverage. Since these drivers have a history of serious traffic violations, they are statistically more likely to be involved in accidents, leading to potential injury or property damage to others. By requiring an FR44 filing, authorities aim to protect other road users by ensuring that these high-risk drivers have the necessary coverage to compensate for damages in case of an accident.

How Does an FR44 Differ from an SR22?

While both the FR44 and SR22 serve the same purpose of providing proof of financial responsibility, there are notable differences between the two:

  1. Coverage Requirements: An FR44 generally requires higher liability insurance limits compared to an SR22. The mandated coverage limits for an FR44 filing can vary from state to state but are generally significantly higher than standard minimum insurance requirements.

  2. Severity of Offenses: An FR44 is usually required for more severe violations, such as repeat DUI/DWI offenses or extremely high BAC levels. On the other hand, an SR22 may be necessary for a broader range of violations, including reckless driving or driving without insurance.

  3. Filing Period: The length of time drivers must maintain an FR44 filing depends on their state’s regulations and the severity of the offense. It’s typically longer than the duration required for an SR22.

Are SR-22 Requirements the Same in Every State?

No, SR22 requirements are not the same in every state. Each state has its own laws and regulations regarding high-risk drivers and SR22 filings. The duration for which you need an SR22 can vary, as well as the specific offenses that trigger the requirement.

For example, if you move from one state to another with an active SR22 filing, you’ll need to fulfill the requirements of your former state until the duration expires. Failure to comply with the SR22 requirements can result in serious consequences, such as license suspension or hefty fines.

female officer writing traffic ticket
image credit - Kindel Media

SR22/FR44 Insurance Requirements by State

When it comes to SR22 and FR44 insurance requirements, each state has its own specific regulations. Let’s take a closer look at the requirements in each state:

Alabama:
In Alabama, drivers who have committed serious traffic offenses, such as DUI or reckless driving, may be required to file an SR22 certificate with the DMV. The duration of the SR22 filing is typically three years from the date of the offense.

Alaska:
Alaska mandates SR22 filings for drivers who have been convicted of certain offenses, such as DUI, driving without insurance, or driving with a suspended license. The SR22 requirement can last up to three years, depending on the severity of the violation.

Arizona:
Arizona requires an SR22 filing for drivers involved in serious accidents or convicted of DUI, reckless driving, or driving with a suspended license. The duration of the SR22 requirement is usually three years.

Arkansas
:
Drivers in Arkansas may be required to file an SR22 if they are convicted of DUI, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The typical SR22 filing period is two years.

California
:
California may require an SR22 filing for drivers involved in at-fault accidents with injuries, DUI convictions, or driving without insurance. The SR22 requirement can last up to three years.

Colorado
:
Colorado imposes SR22 filings on drivers convicted of DUI, driving with a suspended license, or multiple traffic offenses. The SR22 period is usually three years.

Connecticut
:
Connecticut requires an SR22 filing for drivers convicted of DUI, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The typical SR22 filing period is three years.

Delaware
:
In Delaware, drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations may be required to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement can last up to three years.

Florida
:
Florida has FR44 requirements, which are higher liability insurance requirements than SR22. Drivers with DUI convictions must file an FR44 certificate for three years.

Georgia
:
Georgia mandates SR22 filings for drivers convicted of DUI, driving without insurance, or driving with a suspended license. The SR22 requirement typically lasts for three years.

Hawaii
:
Hawaii requires SR22 filings for drivers convicted of DUI or driving without insurance. The typical SR22 filing period is three years.

Idaho
:
In Idaho, drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations may need to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement can last up to three years.

Illinois
:
Illinois imposes SR22 filings on drivers with DUI convictions or driving with a suspended license. The SR22 period is usually three years.

Indiana
:
Indiana requires SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations. The typical SR22 filing period is three years.

Iowa
:
In Iowa, drivers convicted of DUI or driving without insurance may be required to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement can last up to two years.

Kansas
:
Kansas mandates SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, driving without insurance, or multiple traffic offenses. The SR22 period is usually three years.

Kentucky
:
In Kentucky, drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations may need to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement typically lasts for two years.

Louisiana
:
Louisiana requires SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The typical SR22 filing period is three years.

Maine
:
In Maine, drivers convicted of DUI or driving without insurance may be required to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement can last up to three years.

Maryland
:
Maryland mandates FR19 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, driving without insurance, or multiple traffic offenses. The FR19 period is usually three years.

Massachusetts
:
In Massachusetts, drivers with DUI convictions must file an SR22 certificate for three years.

Michigan
:
In Michigan, drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations may need to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement typically lasts for four years.

Minnesota
:
Minnesota requires SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The typical SR22 filing period is three years.

Mississippi
:
In Mississippi, drivers convicted of DUI or driving without insurance may be required to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement can last up to three years.

Missouri
:
Missouri mandates SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions or driving with a suspended license. The SR22 period is usually three years.

Montana
:
Montana requires SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The SR22 requirement typically lasts for three years.

Nebraska
:
In Nebraska, drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations may need to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement can last up to three years.

Nevada
:
Nevada mandates SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The typical SR22 filing period is three years.

New Hampshire
:
New Hampshire does not have a mandatory SR22 requirement.

New Jersey
:
New Jersey requires SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The SR22 period is usually three years.

New Mexico
:
In New Mexico, drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations may need to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement typically lasts for three years.

New York
:
New York requires SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The typical SR22 filing period is three years.

North Carolina
:
North Carolina mandates SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions or driving with a suspended license. The SR22 requirement can last up to three years.

North Dakota
:
In North Dakota, drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations may need to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement can last up to three years.

Ohio
:
Ohio requires SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The SR22 period is usually three years.

Oklahoma
:
In Oklahoma, drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations may need to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement typically lasts for two years.

Oregon
:
Oregon mandates SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The typical SR22 filing period is three years.

Pennsylvania
:
Pennsylvania does not have a mandatory SR22 requirement.

Rhode Island
:
Rhode Island requires SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions or driving with a suspended license. The SR22 period is usually three years.

South Carolina:

In South Carolina, drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations may need to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement can last up to three years.

South Dakota
:
South Dakota mandates SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The SR22 requirement typically lasts for three years.

Tennessee
:
In Tennessee, drivers with DUI convictions or driving without insurance may be required to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement can last up to five years.

Texas
:
Texas requires SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions or driving with a suspended license. The typical SR22 filing period is two years.

Utah
:
In Utah, drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations may need to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement can last up to three years.

Vermont
:
Vermont requires SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The SR22 period is usually three years.

Virginia
:
In Virginia, drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations may need to file an SR22 or an FR44 certificate. The SR22/FR44 requirement can last up to three years.

Washington
:
Washington mandates SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The typical SR22 filing period is three years.

West Virginia
:
In West Virginia, drivers with DUI convictions or driving without insurance may be required to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement can last up to two years.

Wisconsin
:
Wisconsin requires SR22 filings for drivers with DUI convictions, reckless driving, or driving without insurance. The SR22 period is usually three years.

Wyoming:
In Wyoming, drivers with DUI convictions or multiple traffic violations may need to file an SR22 certificate. The SR22 requirement can last up to three years.

Please note that SR22 and FR44 requirements can change over time, so it’s essential to check with your state’s DMV or your insurance provider for the most up-to-date information on SR22 and FR44 insurance requirements.

The Average Cost to Add an SR22 or FR44 Certificate

Adding an SR22 or FR44 certificate to your auto insurance policy can have a significant impact on your premiums. These certificates indicate that you meet the minimum insurance requirements mandated by your state due to past driving offenses. The cost to add an SR22 or FR44 certificate varies based on several factors, including your driving history, location, and the insurance company you choose. Let’s explore the average cost of adding an SR22 or FR44 certificate both nationally and in each state.

National Average:
The national average cost to add an SR22 or FR44 certificate to your existing auto insurance policy is typically around $300 to $800 per year. However, it’s essential to remember that this is just an estimate, and the actual cost can be higher or lower depending on various factors.

Factors Affecting the Cost:
Several factors influence the cost of an SR22 or FR44 certificate. These factors include:

Driving Record: Your driving history plays a crucial role in determining the cost of the SR22 or FR44 certificate. If you have a history of traffic violations or accidents, you’re considered a high-risk driver, which can result in higher premiums.
Location: The state you reside in can significantly impact the cost of the SR22 or FR44 certificate. States with higher accident rates and insurance costs typically have higher premiums.

Insurance Provider: Different insurance companies have varying rates for SR22 and FR44 certificates. It’s essential to compare quotes from multiple providers to find the most affordable option.

Type of Offense: The severity of the offense that led to the SR22 or FR44 requirement can also affect the cost. DUI convictions or more serious violations often result in higher premiums.

SR22/FR44 Cost by State:

Below is a breakdown of the average cost of adding an SR22 or FR44 certificate in each state. Please note that these are approximate figures, and actual prices can vary.

Avg SR-22 / FR44 cost by state

StateSR22 or FR44Avg Costs
AlabamaSR22$300 to $500 per year
AlaskaSR22$350 to $600 per year
ArizonaSR22$400 to $700 per year
ArkansasSR22$300 to $500 per year
CaliforniaSR22$350 to $600 per year
ColoradoSR22$400 to $700 per year
ConnecticutSR22$350 to $600 per year
DelawareSR22$300 to $500 per year
FloridaFR44$800 to $1,500 per year
GeorgiaSR22$400 to $700 per year
HawaiiSR22$350 to $600 per year
IdahoSR22$300 to $500 per year
IllinoisSR22$350 to $600 per year
IndianaSR22$350 to $600 per year
IowaSR22$300 to $500 per year
KansasSR22$400 to $700 per year
KentuckySR22$350 to $600 per year
LouisianaSR22$400 to $700 per year
MaineSR22$350 to $600 per year
MarylandFR19$400 to $700 per year
MassachusettsSR22$800 to $1,500 per year
MichiganSR22$400 to $700 per year
MinnesotaSR22$350 to $600 per year
MississippiSR22$300 to $500 per year
MissouriSR22$350 to $600 per year
MontanaSR22$400 to $700 per year
NebraskaSR22$300 to $500 per year
NevadaSR22$400 to $700 per year
New HampshireN/ANo SR22 requirement
New JerseySR22$350 to $600 per year
New MexicoSR22$350 to $600 per year
New YorkSR22$350 to $600 per year
North CarolinaSR22$300 to $500 per year
North DakotaSR22$350 to $600 per year
OhioSR22$350 to $600 per year
OklahomaSR22$300 to $500 per year
OregonSR22$350 to $600 per year
PennsylvaniaN/ANo SR22 requirement
Rhode IslandSR22$350 to $600 per year
South CarolinaSR22$400 to $700 per year
South DakotaSR22$300 to $500 per year
TennesseeSR22$350 to $600 per year
TexasSR22$400 to $700 per year
UtahSR22$400 to $700 per year
VermontSR22$350 to $600 per year
VirginiaFR44$400 to $700 per year
WashingtonSR22$350 to $600 per year
West VirginiaSR22$350 to $600 per year
WisconsinSR22$350 to $600 per year
WyomingSR22$400 to $700 per year
* These figures are averages and can fluctuate depending on individual circumstances and insurance providers. When seeking an SR22 or FR44 certificate, it's crucial to compare quotes from different companies to find the best coverage and rates for your specific situation. Additionally, maintaining a clean driving record and practicing safe driving habits can help reduce insurance premiums over time.
insurance agent at desk with customer
image credit - RDNE Stock project

Summary

Having an SR22 requirement can be a challenging experience, but it’s essential to understand its purpose and duration to navigate the process smoothly. Remember that an SR22 is not insurance itself but rather a certificate to prove your financial responsibility. The duration of the SR22 requirement can vary from one to three years, depending on your state and the offense that led to the filing.

To get rid of the SR22 faster, be a responsible driver, maintain good credit, and fulfill any additional requirements set by the court or DMV. It’s also vital to keep continuous auto insurance coverage throughout the entire SR22 period.

Lastly, remember that SR22 requirements differ from state to state, so always be aware of the regulations in your specific location. Staying informed and complying with the necessary obligations will ensure a smoother journey back to being a regular, insurance-compliant driver.